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  Crystals and Life: A Personal Journey


by Cele Abad-Zapatero (Author) 

Edition: First




 

 


Book Details:
  • Binding: Paperback 

  • Pages: 280

  • Dimensions (in inches): 0.75 x 8.50 x 5.75

  • Publisher: International University Line 

  • Publication Date: November 11, 2002

  • ISBN: 0-9720774-0-5

  • List Price: $24.95

  • Price: $24.95


Reviews
Reviewer: Hans Deisenhofer, Nobel Laureate in Chemistry
Crystals and Life is a collection of essays on crystals, crystallography, proteins, and science in general that will appeal to both experts and non-experts. Those familiar with the field and immersed in its day-to-day aspects are led to see it from a distinctly different direction. Those unfamiliar are in for a gentle, but always scientifically sound introduction, and will desire to learn more. The author is a prominent protein crystallographer with strong artistic leanings. The way in which he introduces scientific concepts, either with objects from the world of art or with details from the lives of the principal contributors, makes the book itself a work of art…

Reviewer: Wayne A. Hendrickson, Professor of Columbia University
Cele Abad-Zapatero aspires to communicate the discoveries and wonders of crystallography to the ‘educated layperson’ in a lively, inspirational and even poetic form. He does so in a most remarkable mix of science and the arts, of pure and applied, and of technical and personal. Cele is a romantic and a visionary. His keen observations and fabulous cultural repertoire truly do breathe life into crystals. His colorful book will fascinate anyone interested in nature and discovery.

 

 

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Look inside this book

 

Abstract:

The book introduces crystallography and the field and applications of structural biology using metaphors from the arts, music, poetry, and architecture. The reader will find a tapestry filled by personal experiences, historical anecdotes, bibliographical snapshots of scientific heroes of the field, and crystallographic concepts illustrated with artistic analogies. All these elements create a concoction that makes crystallography accessible, comprehensible, intriguing, inspiring, and beautiful. The book is divided in sections covering: the basic elements of crystallography, novel technologies, practical applications, and future perspectives. Since crystallography is quintessentially a visual science, the illustrations play a very important role in providing an excellent set of landmarks to guide the reader on this personal journey of discovery.

      Written by Cele Abad-Zapatero, Abbot Laboratories, Lake Forrest, Illinois.

 

 



  Alexander McPherson, Professor, University of California, Irvine

 

These timely essays contain invaluable insights derived from years of personal experience in the artful application of a rigorous science, and from years of dedication to the communication of those ideas that form its foundation. Students will find welcome relief from the dry approaches that frequently characterize scientific instruction, and professionals in the field will delight in seeing illustrated their common bond with the artistic tradition. The Spanish flavor is exactly right , the rich examples cleverly chosen, and the tone of the essays gentle on the mind. I know others will enjoy reading, and appreciate these essays as much as I have.


 


 

Gale Rhodes, Professor, University of Southern Maine


 

Scientists not already familiar with crystallography will find descriptions and images that should pique their interest and equip them for more rigorous readings. Nonscientists will find reasons for truly intellectual (as opposed to pseudo-mystical) fascination with crystals, and insights into such matters as the power of symmetry and the incisive but indirect means by which scientists develop models of the molecular world. For all readers, I expect that the real staying power of the essays will lie in the author's attempts to show that science, art, music, and the everyday are all of one piece, and that the threads that run through them can be pulled together to make a richer and more satisfying world.